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onethingwell:

With Magit, you can inspect and modify your Git repositories with Emacs. You can review and commit the changes you have made to the tracked files, for example, and you can browse the history of past changes. There is support for cherry picking, reverting, merging, rebasing, and other common Git operations.

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dribbble:

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Ryan for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarMy name is Ryan Brinkerhoff. I am a…

jumoblog:

Earlier this week, we shared the launch of our first ever Jumo campaigns and are already hearing from many of you eager to get involved.

In the coming weeks, we’re excited to introduce you to some inspiring organizations working to improve lives around the world.

In one of our first ever…

bryanbellportfolio:

Mailsmith recently became an open-source application, and to celebrate the change, I was commissioned to produce a new icon.

bryanbellportfolio:

Mailsmith recently became an open-source application, and to celebrate the change, I was commissioned to produce a new icon.

Beth Takes Fun Trip to Japan, Makes Us Totally Jealous

upeicadre:

By Beth Koughan

I recently (yesterday) returned home from Japan, where I and 215 students from 52 countries participated in the first ever “Japan Study Program” (or as we affectionately called it, “United Nations, University Version”). Organized by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), the program sought to raise awareness about the post-disaster situation in Japan, and to reestablish the country as a destination for travel and study. 

The program consisted of a rigorous schedule of activities, each balanced  out with an equally long seminar or lecture. Lecture topics included (but were not limited to): Current Situation of Tourism in Japan; Promotion of International Student Exchange; Responding to the Great East Japan Earthquake; and Tokyo’s Bid to Host the 2020 Olympic Games. These lectures were meticulously prepared with accompanying Powerpoints, and those of us non-Japanese speakers got to enjoy simultaneous English translation via an earpiece (torturous). 

What made this experience better still was the borderline sleep deprivation that nearly all the participants were subjected to. This lack of sleep is explained by the fact that MEXT, when organizing the Program, did not factor “free time” into the schedule, thinking it too dangerous to trust eager international students to their own devices in the world’s largest city. Nevertheless, when the 12 hours of lectures and learning came to an end, most students would take to the streets of Tokyo with their new international BFFs for some exploring, then return to the hotel for a few hoursè sleep and do it all again the next day. 

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ourrisd:

This week I sat with professors in RISD’s Photography Department to chat about one of my favorite topics — visual literacy — a bug I picked up long ago from Donis Dondis’ landmark book on the subject, and am proud to see it practiced and reinvented so bravely by our professors and students in Photography. As the home of the late legendary photography giants Professors Aaron Siskind and Harry Callahan, our rich traditions in image-making via the very first major disruptive technology shift in the visual arts — remember, the camera was to painters as the iPhone is to everything now — has especially relevant intellectual foundations for today’s digitally-confused visual artists. As Professor Eva Sutton, a recent co-host of one of our Shared Voices Presidential Speaker Series, put it so aptly: “There isn’t anything that isn’t a camera anymore.” Indeed. -JM

ourrisd:

This week I sat with professors in RISD’s Photography Department to chat about one of my favorite topics — visual literacy — a bug I picked up long ago from Donis Dondis’ landmark book on the subject, and am proud to see it practiced and reinvented so bravely by our professors and students in Photography. As the home of the late legendary photography giants Professors Aaron Siskind and Harry Callahan, our rich traditions in image-making via the very first major disruptive technology shift in the visual arts — remember, the camera was to painters as the iPhone is to everything now — has especially relevant intellectual foundations for today’s digitally-confused visual artists. As Professor Eva Sutton, a recent co-host of one of our Shared Voices Presidential Speaker Series, put it so aptly: “There isn’t anything that isn’t a camera anymore.” Indeed. -JM

newsme:

(This post is part of News.me’s ongoing series, “Getting the News.” In our efforts to understand everything about social news, we’re reaching out to writers and thinkers we like to ask them how they get their daily news. Read the first post here. See all of the posts, from writers and…

The fast-growing company, which works hard to recruit people to join, says to its newest employees: “If you quit today, we will pay you for the amount of time you’ve worked, plus we will offer you a $1,000 bonus.” Zappos actually bribes its new employees to quit!

Why? Because if you’re willing to take the company up on the offer, you obviously don’t have the sense of commitment they are looking for. It’s hard to describe the level of energy in the Zappos culture—which means, by definition, it’s not for everybody. Zappos wants to learn if there’s a bad fit between what makes the organization tick and what makes individual employees tick—and it’s willing to pay to learn sooner rather than later. (About ten percent of new call-center employees take the money and run.)

votizen:

Fun article about Obama catching “Linsanity” and that he coaches his daughter Sasha’s basketball team on the weekend.

josephschmitt:

For the most part, our dog sleeps and looks cute all day. This is a video of what happens when she loses her mind…